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Palak Dhokla

Recipes
What You Need:
  • Spinach, blanched and pureed - 2 cups
  • Pigeon peas (toovar dal) split - 1 cup
  • Yoghurt - 2 cups
  • Green chillies, chopped - 3
  • Salt to taste
  • Sugar - 1 teaspoon
  • Asafoetida - 1/4 teaspoon
  • Fruit salt - 1 teaspoon
  • Lemon juice - 1 tablespoon
  • Oil - 2 teaspoons + to grease
  • Ask a parent or adult to help with this recipe
Method:
  • Soak the dal for 4 to 6 hours and grind it with yoghurt. Transfer it into a deep bowl.
  • Add green chillies, spinach puree, salt, sugar and asafoetida and mix well.
  • Mix fruit salt in the lemon juice and add it to the batter. Mix well. Add oil and mix again.
  • Grease the dhokla plates. Heat sufficient water in the steamer pot.
  • Pour the batter into the dhokla plates, fit them on the stand and place the stand in the steamer. Close the lid and steam for 15 minutes or till done.
  • Cool slightly, cut into pieces and serve garnished as per your taste.
Recipe for children by Sanjeev Kapoor, Master Chef, Author and Television Host. E-mail: enquiry@sanjeevkapoor.com

Conclusion:

Spinach is thought to have originated in ancient Persia (modern Iran). It is believed that Arab traders carried spinach into India and then the plant was introduced into ancient China, where it was known as the Persian vegetable. The earliest available record of the spinach plant has been found in Chinese, stating that spinach was introduced into China via Nepal in 647AD. There are three basic types of spinach. Savoy has dark green, crinkly and curly leaves. Flat or smooth leaf spinach has broad smooth leaves and semi-savoy is a hybrid variety with slightly crinkled leaves. Florentine is a common part of names of recipes where spinach is a significant ingredient. In the 1930s US spinach growers credited Popeye with a 33% increase in domestic spinach consumption. The spinach growing town of Crystal City, Texas, USA erected a statue of Popeye in 1937. Medieval artists extracted green pigment from spinach to use as ink or paint.

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