Tickly Stuff

Knowledge

WHAT IS TICKLING?
Touching a part of the body to create automatic or unconscious twitching movements or laughter is called tickling. The word 'tickle' has been derived from 'tickelen', an English word from the 16th Century.

In 1987, psychologists G Stanley Hall and Arthur Allin explained tickling as two diverse kinds of phenomena. Knismesis refers to very light movement throughout the body. It normally doesn't create any laughter but can occasionally leave you with an itchy sensation. Gargalesis is a heavy tickle and produces laughter. It occurs when constant pressure is applied around ticklish areas.

TICKLISH SPOTS
We get ticklish in areas where we aren't generally touched. The two most common ticklish areas are the soles of the feet and the underarms.

WHY CAN'T WE TICKLE OURSELVES?
We get tickled by someone else's touch but the same doesn't happen if we tickle ourselves. According to researchers, our brain recognises and reacts differently to another person's touch. So even if we make an attempt to tickle ourselves, our brain foresees the touch and prepares itself for it. Thus the body doesn't react to this touch.

TICKLE TO BOND
According to child psychologists, tickling can prove to be a great bonding mechanism between parents and children. It creates a feeling of delight associated with the parent's touch among children and helps to connect parents with kids. It gives a feeling of security and generates a great bond between the two.

TICKLING ROBOT
'Tickle' is a tiny independent robot that is used to give a pleasant tickling skin massage. It creeps over a reclining body to give a massage. Tickle works on a rechargeable battery and is complete with sensors and motors. It can move forward and backward and can twist to the left or right. Tickle's direction is linked with its motion in a way that protects it from falling off the individual's body.

FEATHERS
Feathers are best used to tickle someone's feet. Try it. You won't stop laughing!

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